The Two Museums of Ghost Ranch

Anthropology & paleontology on campus.

ghostranch-logoI wrote a recent post about a short visit to Ghost Ranch. There was time on my group’s program to look in on two worthwhile museums that offer classes and workshops but can also be visited on a one-day entry.

Florence Hawley Ellis Museum of Anthropology

Dr. Martha Yates
Dr. Martha Yates

Named after museum founder Florence Hawley Ellis, one of the first women to receive a Ph.D. in anthropology (University of Chicago, in 1934), this museum specializes displays ancient artifacts from Paleo Indian cultures reaching back 10,000 years.  Ellis and her students are best known for discovering an archaeological site north of the ranch. There, they unearthed a remarkable group of ceramic pots hidden in a lava field. – never happens. It was a remarkable site to have stumbled upon.”

Early pueblo pottery includes blackware, a type that continues to be produced today.
Early pueblo pottery includes blackware, a type that continues to be produced today.

The museum is named for the late Dr. Florence Hawley Ellis, long-time professor of anthropology at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and original curator of this museum. Dr. Ellis initiated and led Ghost Ranch archaeology seminar from 1971 until 1990, and now, Dr. Martha Yates is in charge of the collection that includes finds from 20nold villages on the mesa between Abiquiu and Española.

The Museum of Anthropology excavation class Can You Dig It continues excavation on Ranch property sites and is part of our summer programming in July, open to all. We also offer a two-week Archaeological Surveying class in October, with the chance to hike through areas not open to the public and discover unknown, unmapped archaeological sites at Ghost Ranch.

Ruth Hall Museum of Paleontology

Ghost Ranch boasts a dig-site a laboratory for sorting out and cataloging bones and a museum displaying both the process and the specimens. In 1985 an 8-ton block of plaster-encased dinosaur bones was hoisted onto a flatbed truck and moved from an on-site quarry to the main campus of Ghost Ranch. The Ruth Hall Museum of Paleontology was built around it and named for amateur paleontologist Ruth Hall, wife of Jim Hall, the first resident director of Ghost Ranch.

It takes a trained eye to identify fossilized bones from a complicated digsite.
It takes a trained eye to identify fossilized bones from a complicated digsite.

The paleontological dig at Ghost Ranch is known world-wide. Resident paleontologist Alex Down, an ebullient man with a passion for paleontology, is currently at work on a large block taken from the quarry on Ghost Ranch. Visit the museum and watch fossil discovery right before your eyes. Treasures from the Triassic era  from 210 million years ago include two little dinosaurs discovered at Ghost Ranch decades apart are the bones of the Coelophysis,, which roamed the ranch 220 million years ago, were discovered in 1947. More recently, the Tawa Hallae and new, very well preserved, articulated skeleton of of Vancleavea, was discovered at Ghost Ranch. Newly renovated exhibits also highlight the recent discoveries of Tawa, a new species of small carnivorous dinosaur and Effigia, the archosaur species named okeeffeae (O’Keeffe’s Ghost).