Category Archives: Airports

DIA Gets Yoga Studio

DIA studios the nation’s first.

Yoga on the Fly opens at Denver International Airport’s Terminal A on November 7 with expansion elsewhere airports planned for 2018. There are five private mini-studios equipped with instructional videos, Yoga By Numbers yoga mats, SoundOff wireless headphones and an “essentials beauty bar” that includes facial cleansing towels, hand lotion and some essential oils.

Class options include yoga, meditation and breathwork using instructional iPad videos. Classes can be combined for longer sessions. Each is  from eight to 20 minutes of guided movement  designed specifically for such travel-related issues as poor circulation, muscle aches, anxiety and more.

The DIA studio begins with a 90-day “residency” (just in time for the holiday season). It is open Sunday through Friday,  7 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Classes range in price from $15 for 15 minutes to $60 for 60 minutes. t is possible to mix and match classes for the full 60 minutes. Each mini-studio room will be for one person, with five rooms total and will be open to anyone from pilots to airport workers to travelers of all ages (and yoga levels).

Southern Africa Snapshots, Part IV

South Africa, Swaziland & Zimbabwe wrap-up.

My early posts from this trip each contained just one or two captioned images. The end of trip involved more travel time and fewer sites, so I am posting several images from each. By this time, the end was in sight, and I was not ready to come home. Then again, much as I love my husband and my home and my town and my cat, I want each trip to last just a bit longer.

Day 11 – Zambezi River (Botsawana)

Photos follow from a  “sunset cruise” (i.e., boat ride) on the tranquil Zambezi River before it plunges down the canyons and cataracts of Victoria Falls.

Welcome dancers at riverside where the boats leave from.
The river’s namesake in a can.
Calm waters.
Enormous elephant browsing on the bank.
Hippos in the stream.
Many boats on the river, including this one that strangely but inaccurately reminds me of “The African Queen.” The boat in the romantic adventure film had no canopy.
The main event.

Day 12 – Victoria Falls

Like Kruger National Park, Victoria Falls merits more a longer visit.  I enjoyed the scheduled half-day visit (pix below)  but I ended up not visiting a village in the afternoon. Too blazing hot.

English gets second billing on Zimbabwe park signs.
Thirty-eight wet stone steps to the first designated lookout over the massive falls.
Statue of Scottish explorer Dr. David Livingtone, the first European to see these falls.
“Thunder smoke” is what Africans call the falls.
Roiling waters.
Wide falls dropping from a broad basalt shelf.
Canyon cascade.
Rainbow.
Some of the offerings at the Sinathanayu Market on the fringes of Victoria Falls Village.
The Victoria Falls Hotel feeds threatened vultures every day. These large scavengers are not agile and perish on power lines or by eating poisoned carrion.
Fortune teller holds forth in a staw hut within the cavernous BOM A Restaurant where w cultural show and gut-busting buffet take place.

Day 13 – Victoria Falls Hotel

Last morning in Africa. I could (and probably should have) taken the opportunity to interact with orphaned lions that have been habituated to humans, but I just wanted to stay at the Victoria Falls Hotel to contemplate, pack and steel myself for the three-flight return to Colorado. I hung out on a hotel terrace for a time and watched the birds.  No wildlife came to drink and no dramatic sunrise showed itself, but I still reveled the quite time of morning.

Then it was time to say farewell to our wonderful guide, Anni Hennup.
No airport images from Botswana because some fool on my inbound. flight caused trouble by taking disembarkation photos. Major but totally avoidable hassle. Landed in Cape Town on a rainy afternoon with beautiful light and even a farewell rainbow.

Looking forward to another trip to Africa sometime in the future.

Spirit: Worst Airline in America?

Actual riot breaks out in boarding area.

My husband and I flew Spirit Airlines once. The delays and the nickel-and-diming caused us to vow: Never again. And we’ve kept that vow, not just for Spirit but for Frontier and other low-cost, no-service companies and their flying misery machines.

On Sunday, a riot broke out at Hollywood-Fort Lauderdale Airport after nine or more flights were canceled. Apple News “the  airline blames a pilot slowdown and is suing pilot the union, alleging that they have been deliberately stalling flights as retaliation over contract disputes. According to the lawsuit, Spirit had canceled 81 flights in one day across the country and approximately 300 over the past week. People tweeted videos of the massive crowd surrounding the counter, some showing the escalation of the mass argument from verbal to physical when authorities stepped in.”

Click here for the ABC News report.

 

EU Set to Require Visas of U.S. Citizens

Response to Trump administration immigration crackdown.

The saying, “What goes around comes around” applies to international travel. In response to deportations, border stops and  other crackdowns on foreign visitors to the U.S. and immigrants too, the European Parliament voted to end visa-free travel for Americans within the EU.

The U.S. government could not  bring itself to agree to visa-free travel for citizens from five EU countries (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Poland and Romania), so American citizens will be required to obtain visas. The vote urges the revocation of the scheme within two months, meaning Americans will have to apply for visas. The intricacies are complicated and may end up before  the European Court of Justice.

Current policies have become known as the “Trump slump.” The U.S. Travel Association has said the administration’s immigration policies are hurting tourism, citing  “mounting signs” of “a broad chilling effect on demand for international travel to the United States.”

Then again, there are a lot of people, including VIPS, whom the U.S. seems to discourage from visiting. Heavy-handed airport detentions of visitors from abroad do nothing to encourage inbound visitation. Consider that in the few weeks since the inauguration, the following are among the high-profile visitors help up at the airport:

  • Kjell Magne Bondevik, a former prime minister of Norway was detained for an hour at Washington’s Dulles International Airport. His “crime”: visiting Iran in 2014 for a human rights conference.
  • Mem Fox, a 70-year-old children’s book author from Australia on her 100th visit to the U.S., was detained at Los Angeles International Airport for two hours and treated so rudely that she collapsed in tears in her hotel room and vowed never to come back.
  • Henry Rousso, an Egyptian-born French Holocaust historian, was detained for 10 hours at Houston’s Intercontinental Airport en route to give a talk at Texas A&M. He was told that he would not be permitted to receive an honorarium for his talk on a tourist visa. He had frequently visited over the last 30 years.
  • Celeste Omin, a software engineer from Nigeria was detained in New York when coming to work at Andela, a startup that connects the top tech talent in Africa with employers in the U.S. Andela accepts less than 1% of applicants into its program and is backed by Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan.

A former head of state, a renowned author, a renowned historian and a top software engineer! There are doubtless more, but these four come to mind.

World’s Longest Flight

Doha-Auckland an airborne marathon.

Qatar Airways’ inaugural being welcome with water at Auckland.

The first run of the world’s longest commercial flight — Qatar Airways’ 9,032-miler from Doha to Auckland — has been completed.  Flight QR920 landed ive minutes ahead of schedule after a  daunting 16-hour, 23-minute flight across 10 time zones — longer than the entire “Lord of the Rings” and “The Hobbit” trilogies that were filmed in New Zealand, the airline noted the airline. Bring on the compression socks.

Four pilots and 15 cabin crew members were aboard. The latter served 1,100 cups of tea and coffee, 2,000 cold drinks and 1,036 meals during the flight. I hope to food on Qatar is decent and the seats not too uncomfortable. In keeping with international tradition to welcome inaugural flights, the Auckland airport rescue service showered the plane with water cannons on arrival.

The Qatar flight replaces  Emirates’ 8,824-mile flight from Dubai to Auckland in the record books. Last year, I flew for 14 or more hours from Los Angeles to Shanghai. I watched four movies, read some and napped a little. By that measure,  Qatar Airways’ new flight would be good for five movies.

Spiffed Up Miami Airport Food Scene

North Terminal Marketplace debuts.

mia-logoEn route to and from Lima, Peru, and Havana, Cuba, in the last few months, I spent interminable hours at Miami International Airport. During one stopover, I was so uncomfortable that I booked a day room for a few hours at the dispiriting airport hotel.

Things are about to get better with the opening of the cheerful  North Terminal Marketplace, a row of 10 new restaurants and shops to provide a multi-cultural taste of Miami without leaving the airport. 

mis-marketplace

The diverse collection of dining and retail locations includes iconic brands and local small businesses: 305 Pizza; Chefs of the Caribbean, which serves island favorites such as conch fritters and Jamaican patties; Cuban Crafters cigars; Estefan Kitchen Express, owned by music superstars Emilio and Gloria Estefan; Fig and Fennel, a farm-to-table eatery owned by Miami Beach hot spot Icebox Café; Half Moon Empanadas; a Miami Marlins merchandise store; Maru and Friends, which features collectible, ethnically diverse porcelain dolls by award-winning artist Dianna Effner; My Ceviche, the popular seafood deli with five locations in Miami; and The Penguin Store, by Miami-based Perry Ellis. Members of the local business community will join MIA officials and Marketplace tenants for free menu samples, giveaways, discounts and entertainment. I’m not dreading my next stopover quite so much.

Cuba Flights About to Take Off

JetBlue is the first with regular flights.

JetBllueWith the normalization of U.S. -Cuba relations, airlines are gearing up to start scheduled (i.e., non-charter) service. JetBlue is the first to pull away from the gate with one-way fares from $99 beginning August 1 flying between Fort Lauderdale airport (FLL) in Florida and Cuba’s Santa Clara (SNU) . The carrier has been servicing Cuba with charter flights. If all goes according to plans, Camagüey and Holguín flights are to be added in November, eventually also Havana flights are to begin.

Powerful Cyclone Slams Fiji

Taking Cyclone Winston a bit personally.

FijiMe-logoI’ve visited Fiji, a beautiful island nation in the South Pacific populated by people who exemplify the Polynesian tradition of hospitality. I’m dismayed to read about Winston, the most powerful ever recorded with winds of 180 mph with gusts over of 220 mph, that slammed into Fiji. It has resulted in relatively few fatalities — thus far.

The lei is not just a Hawaiian sign of welcome, but a Polynesian one. Bula as experssed by a string of beautiful blossoms and the sweet scent of plumeria and other tropical flowers.. l
The lei is not just a Hawaiian sign of welcome, but a Polynesian one. Bula as experssed by a string of beautiful blossoms and the sweet scent of plumeria and other tropical flowers.. l

Some 900,000 people are scattered among the 100 or so inhabited islands of the total of 332.  Communications, water, electricity and sewerage must surely have been impacted, but how strongly is still unknown. And then there are the airports.  I flew Air Pacific to Nadi, one of the country’s largest cities, and from there to smaller islands — each with a ferry pier and/or a grass or asphalt airstrip. Fiji boasts secluded and yes, romantic resorts on outlying islands.

CycloneWinston

In the interim, Air Pacific has become Fiji Airways, and my husband and I are scheduled to fly to Australia with them early next month.  We have a stopover in Nadi. Reports are that the storm tracked between the two biggest islands. Suva, the capital, and Nadi, where there main airport is located, are both on Viti Levu. The country will reportedly still be under a curfew and state of emergency when we pass through.

American cities on Fiji Airways’ route map are Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York and Honolulu. It also serves Australian and New Zealand and is a popular and convenient getaway for folks from both. Here’s hoping for the visitors and the tourism infrastructure catering to them that clean-up is fast — more importantly, for the Fijians that their beautiful islands are restored to full function very soon.

Lufthansa Adding Denver-Munich Nonstops

New Airbus service to begin in May.

Lufthansa-logoI have long felt that Denver and Munich are twin cities in spirit, separated by history and time zones. Both are near the mountains but not in the mountains. Both display the energetic pulse of a young, active population. And of course, they are both famous for beer. And come May 11, they will be on either end of new nonstop flights. My husband and I were just talking about our next European trip, so we might well book this one.

A Lufthansa Airbus A330-300 will fly the five-times weekly service. The new eastbound LH 481 will operate on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, departing Denver at 4:05 p.m. and arriving in Munich the following morning. The westbound LH 480 service will also operate on Tuesdays, Wednesday, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, departing from Lufthansa’s Munich hub at 11:45 a.m. and arriving in Denver at 2:30 p.m.(all times local) after a 10 hour, 45 minute flight.

The Denver-Munich route is  the first time that the A330-300 has been scheduled for regular service at Denver International Airport — 177 in Economy and Economy Plus, 30 in Business and a handful in the ethereal front cabin.

Allegiant: Low Fare + No Air

Allegiant passengers forced onto aircraft wing upon landing in Boise.

AllegiantAirLogoWho ever expects that an airline ticket will include unbreathable cabin “air”? Some passengers on Allegiant Air that landed in Boise the other day, who ended up standing on the aircraft wing, found out that it could happen. According to a report in the Idaho Statesman, “Passengers were forced to escape onto the wing of an Allegiant Air plane after fumes leaked into the cabin on landing. The worrying incident happened after Flight 330 had landed at Boise Airport in Idaho, U.S. from Los Angeles.”

Passengers waiting on the wing of a just-landed Allegiant Air plane after foul cabin air forced them to except. It happened in Boise. Good that it wasn't winter or windy. The carrier reportedly compensated them with $50 for the inconvenience.
Passengers waiting on the wing of a just-landed Allegiant Air plane after foul cabin air forced them to except. It happened in Boise. Good that it wasn’t winter or windy. The carrier reportedly compensated them with $50 for the inconvenience.

Passengers reported smoke and a smell of fuel in the cabin the plane taxied to the gate in Boise. Some of the 163 passengers escaped onto the wing after fumes leaked into the cabin upon landing. Even after the emergency evacuation, some were dismayed at the way the airline dealt with the situation. “Passengers Criticize Allegiant Air’s Handling of the Evacuation.”

This follows another Allegiant Air emergency landing in Clearwater, Florida just a week earlier, when minutes after takeoff, the crew reported smoke in the cabin and was forced to return to the airport. Four passengers and one flight attendant reportedly sustained injuries that time.

According to a press released issued by BerlinRosen Public Affairs on behalf of a client that I can’t seem to identify, “Allegiant pilots have been raising concerns about the airline’s bare-minimum approach that’s infused all aspect of its operation. Earlier this year, Teamsters Aviation Mechanics Coalition (TAMC) released a report that shows the airline experiences a high rate of air returns and diversions due to mechanical issues. Between January and March of 2015 alone, there were 38 new instances of fixable mechanical issues such as engines failing, pressurization problems, smoke in the cockpit, radar being inoperable and anti-ice devices on windshields failing.” T

his follows another Allegiant Air emergency landing in Clearwater, Florida, just a week earlier, when minutes after takeoff, the crew reported smoke in the cabin and was forced to return to the airport in Clearwater. Four passengers and one flight attendant sustained injuries.  This is a result of what I think of as the Walmartization of America, turning us into a nation of bottom-feeders.  Cut costs to the bone, no matter what the possible consequences.  It is fortunate that there were only survivable injuries in the Clearwater incident and none reported in Boise, where BTW, Allegiant reportedly gave each affected passenger a $50 certificate. I wonder how many people will actually use it. I wouldn’t.