Category Archives: History

Sand Creek Massacre Commemorations Begin

150th anniversary of proclamation that set off senseless slaughter.

SandCreekMassacre-sign2Let’s remember that the United States Park Service not only protects wild and beautiful places but also historic sites, documenting the good, the bad and the ugly in American history. It has been 150 years, since war between Volunteer U.S. Army units and the Cheyenne and Arapaho boiled up and swept the High Plains. To seek public support for his war efforts, Territorial Governor John Evans issued a June Proclamation asking “peaceful Indians” to report to U.S. Army forts, most Cheyenne and Arapaho had just received that message before he offered a new declaration to the settlers in Colorado. It was ill-intentioned in the first place, but then went wrong besides.

A modest memorial commemorates a dreadful event.
A modest memorial commemorates a dreadful event.

As the Park Service explains, “The August 11 proclamation stated that Evans authorized the citizens of Colorado ‘to kill and destroy, as enemies of the country… all hostile Indians.’ This edict argued that peaceful Plains Indians had received sufficient time to report to the forts; therefore independent citizens were justified in attacking hostile Indians and seizing goods from them.

“As a consequence of these actions, war on the Plains continued even as peace chiefs sought a way to negotiate with Colorado’s leadership. Soon, elements of the First and Third Regiments attacked Sand Creek’s peaceful village, killing women and children, poisoning relations, and destroying the peace process for years.”

Dramatic skies over the Plains that the been home to the Cheyenne and other groups forever, but when they were in the white pioneers' way, tragedy ensued.
Dramatic skies over the Plains that the been home to the Cheyenne and other groups forever, but when they were in the white pioneers’ way, tragedy ensued.

The proclamation set off the Massacre that occurred in November and has been a stain on Colorado’s history for a century and a half. The Sand Creek Massacre Historic Site commemorates the tragedy. Click here to read more about the fatal proclamation and the Third Colorado Cavalry, or better, visit the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site outside of Eads, Colorado. I cannot help but find tragic parallels between the Sand Creek tragedy and the events going on now in Gaza.

Buffalo Bill Days Are Here

Great Western showman celebrated Golden.

BuffaloBillDays-logoBuffalo Bill Cody was probably buried atop Lookout Mountain in Golden, though there are those he believe that a posse of Wyomingites spirited his casket to his namesake town of Cody. If so, they didn’t erect a marker. Golden, however, has a commanding monument.

Rocks, rocks and more rocks mark Buffalo Bill's Grave atop Lookout Mountain high over Golden, Colorado.
Rocks, rocks and more rocks mark Buffalo Bill’s Grave atop Lookout Mountain high over Golden, Colorado.

Golden also honors the great showman with Buffalo Bill Days, (July 23-27), a huge celebration that turns 60 this year and has never looked better. The local Lions Club organizes this free annual festival, which is jam-packed with Western entertainment, live music, kids’ activities, food trucks, beer garden, muttin bustin’ and the beloved Best of the West parade. Beginning with a simple trail ride up to Buffalo Bill’s Grave in the 1940s, Buffalo Bill Days has turned into a multi-day that includes:

  • Best of the West Parade– A highlight of the festival, the Best of the West Parade starts at 10 a.m. on Saturday, July 26. A feast for the eyes, you’ll see trotting horses, colorful Old West characters and fanfare, collectible cars, real cowboys, Native American dancers, and more. Saddle on up to Washington Avenue in beautiful historic downtown Golden early – you won’t want to miss the fun.
  • Cody’s Wild West– In the spirit of the original traveling show that brought the Wild West to the world, this year’s Cody’s Wild West reflects a rugged American spirit and originality. Western performers make up this 90-minute extravaganza on the west end of the Lions Park Ball Fields on 10th Street on Saturday, July 26 at 12:30 p.m. 
  • Live Music– The entertainment starts at 5 p.m. on Friday, July 25 with live music by Chris Daniels and the Kings and continues all weekend in Parfet Park in downtown Golden. Brad Lee Schroeder is the featured band on Saturday night along with other local bands. The Long Run “Colorado’s Tribute to the Eagles” closes out Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m.
  • Muttin Bustin’– If you haven’t seen muttin bustin’ before, make sure that you don’t miss this raucous show and Buffalo Bill Days tradition. On Sunday, July 27 at 11 a.m. children aged five to seven years strap on a helmet and vest and hang on to a sprinting sheep for as long as possible in Lions Park.
  • Car Shows– Though Buffalo Bill was known for his horsemanship, it’s safe to say that he would have appreciated the gorgeous automobiles in the classic and orphaned car shows on Sunday, July 27 beginning at 10 a.m. on the Clear Creek Bridge to 14th on Washington Avenue.

FoMoInfo contact the Buffalo Bill Days Committee, 303-279-3342.

New Franklin Museum & Franklin Events

America’s favorite founding father honored on his 308th birthday

BenFranklinOver coffee this morning, friends and I were talking about American history. My contention was that in the Northeast, the emphasis — at least when I was in school — was on the colonial and revolutionary eras. My theory is underscored by news that Philadelphia is  honoring Ben Franklin’s 308th birthday on January 17-19 with a variety of celebrations. Free admission to new Benjamin Franklin Museum, a Franklin-themed getaway giveaway, birthday parties and appearances by Ben himself are among the festivities to honor the man the city calls America’s favorite Founding Father.

Here’s a look at how Philadelphia will mark Ben’s big day a week from now:

Fun & Free

  • In honor of the frugal Founding Father’s birthday, Visit Philadelphia is providing free admission for up to 1,250  visitors to the new Benjamin Franklin Museum all birthday weekend (January 17-19) long. History buffs can explore Franklin’s life and accomplishments through interactive activities, artifacts, video  presentations and more.  318 Market Street; 267-514-1523.
  •  Franklin left a legacy of sayings that are repeated dozens of times each day. But which are people’s favorites? During the week leading up to his birthday, Visit Philadelphia is conducting daily Facebook polls that encourage fans to vote for a quote. Each day  from January 13 to January 17, Visit Philadelphia will post two quotes. Every Facebook follower who votes for their favorite will be entered to win a Franklin-themed getaway prize package, including hotel  accommodations, admission to various Franklin-themed attractions, gift certificates for Franklin-inspired meals and more.
The Benjamin Franklin Museum opened last August. (Visit Philly photo)
The Benjamin Franklin Museum opened last August. (Visit Philly photo)

Parties, Processions, Tours & Tales

  • The American Philosophical Society (APS), one of the organizations created by Ben, honors its founder during Benjamin Franklin’s Birthday 2014 Celebration – Observing the  World. Representatives from various organizations bearing a  Franklin birthright gather at APS on January 17 and proceed to Franklin’s grave at Christ Church Burial Ground for a wreath-laying and tributes. The procession starts at 427 Chestnut Street and ends at 5th  & Arch Streets.
  • At the National Constitution Center, visitors can get their photos taken with a life-size statute of Ben in Signers’  Hall, sign a birthday card and then enjoy some birthday cake. In honor  of Franklin’s 308th birthday, guests also enjoy $3.08 off   general admission tickets on January 17525 Arch  Street, 215-409-6700,
  • The over-21 set joins a Colonial guide for the “Tippler’s  Tour with Ben Franklin, “a rollicking pub crawl, on January 17  and 18, with stops for  drinks and snacks at four Old City establishments. A Franklin re-enactor joins  the tour along the way and stays for a chat at City Tavern, the final stop. Historic Philadelphia  Center, 6th & Chestnut Streets, 215- 629-4026.
  • Throughout the 18th and 19th  centuries, Philadelphia was a publishing powerhouse, thanks in large part to      Benjamin Franklin and Edgar Allan Poe. The “Franklin and Poe: Philadelphia’s Adopted Literary Sons” program in the Second Bank  of the United States on January 17 and 19 shares the duo’s literary accomplishments and their roles in shaping American culture. 420 Chestnut Street, 215- 965-2305.
  • More than three centuries after his birth, Franklin remains ageless in his many portraits. Ben buffs can join a National Park Service ranger for the “Happy Birthday Benjamin Franklinprogram  in the Portrait Gallery at the Second Bank of the United States on January 17-19. It  highlights photos of Franklin and his contemporaries and touches on how  their contributions continue to impact the world. 420 Chestnut Street; 215-965-2305.
  • At the Historic Philadelphia Cemter, there are family-friendly activities all weekend long. including more free birthday cake at 1:00 p.m. on January 17.  Historic Philadelphia Center, 6th & Chestnut Streets; 215-629-4026.

If Philadelphia does all this for Franklin’s 308th, I can hardly imagine how it will celebrate the 310th or 325th.

Historic Hotels Annual Awards

Historic Hotels of America honors its own

HistoricHotels-logoEarly next month, I will be spending a night in the wonderful Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado. I’ve toured the hotel, I’ve dined there, I’ve had drinks there but I’ve never yet stayed overnight. Not that I’m afraid of the paranormal  activities reports of the hotel that suspense-meister Stephen King used as a model for “The Shining,” but it’s an hour from my house, and I don’t customarily pay for an overnight so close to home. The Stanley is hosting a holiday party for the Society of American Travel Writers’ local members, and so I will finally get to stay there at a discounted rate.

The Stanley has just won another honor, this one for social media, one of Historic Hotels of America’s 2013 Annual Awards, which were just announced at Milwaukee”s grand Pfister Hotel,  honor, encourage and recognize the most exemplary historic hotels, hotelier, and leaders.

The Historic Hotels of America Hotel of the Year Award is the highest honor awarded. The Best Historic Hotel awards are given to historic hotels demonstrating the highest contributions to furthering the celebration of history and demonstrating leadership and innovation. I have always owned old house (an 1870s brownstone in Hoboken and now an 189os prairie Victorian in Boulder. Knowing what it takes to maintain an old home, I can not even imagine how the task of restoring and renovating is magnified when it comes to even a modest hotel — and even with a big budget and a staff. Therefore, to me, the “encourage” component is major.

2013 Honorees

  • New Member of the Year. The Jefferson (1923), Washington, D.C.
  • Historic Hotelier of the Year. Dennis Costello, Historic Hotel Bethlehem (1922),  Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
  • Best Small Historic Inn/Hotel (Under 75 Guest Rooms). The Wort Hotel (1941),  Jackson, Wyoming
  • Best Historic Hotel (75 to 200 Guest Rooms). Gettysburg Hotel (Est. 1797),  Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Note: This is particularly appropriate since the awards were announced the same time as the 150th celebration of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. The hotel is one of the stops in a town tour that follows the footsteps of President Abraham Lincoln during his November 1863 visit. Guests may also stand in the room where Lincoln crafted the resounding Gettysburg Address at the David Wills House Museum.
  • Best Historic Hotel (200 to400 Guest Rooms). Ojai Valley Inn & Spa (1923), Ojai, California
  • Best Historic Hotel (Over 400 Guest Rooms). Grand Hotel Marriott Resort, Golf Club & Spa (1847),  Point Clear, Alabama
  • Best City Center Historic Hotel. The Willard InterContinental (1850), Washington, D.C.
  •  Best Historic Resort. French Lick Resort (1845), French Lick, Indiana
  •  Hotel Historian of the Year. Bob Tagatz, Grand Hotel (1887), Mackinac Island, Michigan
  •  Legendary Family Historic Hoteliers of the Year. The Morrissey Family, The Saint Paul Hotel (1910),  St. Paul, Minnesota
  •  Best Historic Restaurant in Conjunction with a Historic Hotel.Plume at The Jefferson, (1923), Washington, D.C.
  •  Best Social Media of a Historic Hotel. The Stanley (1909), Estes Park, Colorado
  • Historic Hotels of America Sustainability Champion. Timberline Lodge (1938),  Timberline, Oregon
  • Historic Hotels of America Ambassador of the Year (Quarter Century Service) . George Moore, The Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel & Spa (1852), Mobile, Alabama
  •  Historic Hotels of America Heritage Award. The Marcus Family, The Pfister Hotel (1893), Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  •  Historic Hotels of America Community Leadership Award. The Lenox (1900). Boston, Massachusetts
  •  Historic Hotels of America Lifetime Achievement Award. Thierry Roch, Former Executive Director, Historic Hotels of America

Visions of Venice

 “La Serenissima” never fails to captivate

VeniceCoatofArmsThis was my fourth visit to Venice — the first in too many years. It is one of the most beautiful cities on the planet, and as such, attracts unbelievable crowds. Unless you go out very early, stay out very late or get off the well-traveled paths, the hordes are unbelievable. At one point, I tried to count the number of guides’ flags and furled umbrellas within my line of sight, but I couldn’t.

Fortunately and serendipitously, my husband and I arrived for a short stay in the wee hours of the morning, long before our small hotel was unlocked. We hung around the Rialto, watching a woman sell beer to teenagers through the security gate of a café. When we were able to leave our stuff at the hotel and stroll to St. Mark’s Square at daybreak. We visited some of the main attractions, including hyper-touristy Murano and Burano, but I tried hard to focus on the details — the close-up charmers that make Venice so captivating, crowds or not. Here’s a random selection of very personal images of people, places and things that caught my eye:

Streetlight near the Doges' Palace at daybreak.
Streetlight near the Doges’ Palace at daybreak.
Painter capturing the Bridge of Sighs before the touristic hordes arrive.
Painter capturing the Bridge of Sighs before the touristic hordes arrive.
Misty morning view of San Giorgio Maggiore.from across the Guidecca Canal from St/.Mark's.
Misty morning view of San Giorgio Maggiore, designed in the 16th century by Augusto Palladio. It sits on a small island across the Guidecca Canal from St. Mark’s.

 

The beautiful clock face on the well-name Torre dell'Orlogio. It shows the signs of the zodiac and the phases of the moon in addition to the time.
The beautiful clock face on the well-name Torre dell’Orlogio on the north side of the Piazza San Marco shows the signs of the zodiac and the phases of the moon in addition to the time.
Typical group scene on Piazza San Marco, which I keep referring to as St. Mark's.
Typical group scene on Piazza San Marco (aka, St. Mark’s Square). The crowds are overwhelming and the line to enter the Basilica daunting — but worth the wait.

 

Three gondoliers, waiting on a small wooden bridge for their first customers to show up.
Three gondoliers, waiting on a small wooden bridge for their first customers to show up.
One of the many small canals that lace is islands in the Venetian Lagoon.
One of the many small canals that lace is islands in the Venetian Lagoon.
A flower-bedecked arch at one of a couple of universities in the city.
A flower-bedecked arch at one of a couple of universities in the city.
Souvenir stands all over the city sell knock-offs of the Carnivale masks that make this pre-Lenten festival one of the world's most dramatic.
Souvenir stands all over the city sell knock-offs of the Carnivale masks that make this pre-Lenten festival one of the world’s most dramatic.
As the glass-maker's island in the Lagoon, Murano is dotted with glass street art. this fanciful sculpture is not far from Il Faro, the island's landmark lighthouse.
As the glass-maker’s island in the Lagoon, Murano is dotted with glass street art. This fanciful flower sculpture is not far from Il Faro, the island’s landmark lighthouse. There resemblances to the work of American art glass meister Dale Chihuly, who in fact created a “Venetian Series” to honor the commonality.

 

Murano's ancient (started in the 12th century) Basilica dei Santi Maria e Donato is known for its elegant colonnade and beautiful mosaic floor.
Murano’s Basilica dei Santi Maria e Donato, begun in the 12th century, is known for its elegant colonnade and beautiful mosaic floor.

 

The island of Burano is know for lace -making and for brightly painted buildings.
The island of Burano is know for lace -making and for brightly painted buildings.
Lovely architectural details like this Moorish-influenced window are all over Venice.
Lovely architectural details like this Moorish-influenced window are all over Venice.
One of many palazzo along the Grand Canal.
One of many palazzi along the Grand Canal.
Venice clings to its past but is also very much engaged in present events. This palazzo hosts cultural exhibitions.
Venice clings to its past but is also very much engaged in present events. This palazzo hosts cultural exhibitions.

 

The Rialto in the wee hours of the morning. This iconic stone bridge was completed in 1591, replacing earlier wooden bridges. It was the only bridge across the Grand Canal until 1854. Centuries of gondolier job security, when these craft were true transportation -- not a tourist attraction.
The Rialto in the wee hours of the morning. This iconic stone bridge was completed in 1591, replacing earlier wooden bridges. It was the only bridge across the Grand Canal until 1854. Centuries of gondolier job security, when these craft were true transportation — not a tourist attraction.
Late autumn and early winter rains and high tides cause flooding in the Lagoon almost every year. Add to that rising sea levels and cruise ships sailing right up to Venice's doorstep, and you have a highly threatened city. In addition to world water engineers trying to keep the Lagoon waters at bay, New York-based Save Venice Inc. supports stabilization and restoration projects.
Late autumn and early winter rains and high tides cause flooding in the Lagoon almost every year. Add to that rising sea levels and cruise ships sailing right up to Venice’s doorstep, and you have a highly threatened city. In addition to world water engineers trying to keep the Lagoon waters at bay, New York-based Save Venice Inc. supports stabilization and restoration projects in this magnificent city that is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Milford Track at 125 Years

New Zealand’s premier walking route celebrates a milestone

MilfordTrack-signNew Zealand is one of my very favorite countries. Its marvelous landscape of mountain and seacoast, its wonderful friendly people and its vibrant cities are unsurpassed. Next month, the Milford Track, one of the island nation’s nine Great Walks, celebrates a special anniversary. To mark the 125th anniversary of the opening of Milford Track, the Department of Conservation (DOC) has organized a guided, commemorative heritage walk between October 31 and November 3.

The guides, clad in period costumes, will add a nostalgic element to the 33.2-mile walk on the spectacular South Island as they tell historic tales mixed with their own real-life experiences. Hikers are also encouraged to dress in theme attire as described in the early guides, some dating back as far as the 1890s. At the end of the walk, which takes approximately four days, hikers are rewarded with the sight of the spectacular Milford Sound, described by storyteller Rudyard Kipling as the “eighth wonder of the world’”and on the bucket list of thousands of international travelers every year.

MillfordTrack2

I actually have been on Milford Sound on a day trip from Queenstown, but it was winter and raining to beat the band. We saw nothing but streams and waterfalls cascading from the surrounding banks, so it is still on my bucket list.

Cal-Neva Set for Major Makeover

Tahoe area’s oldest casino expected to retain retro feel

The Cal-Neva's distinctive lodge entrance.Three-and-half years ago, I took a historic tour of the fabled Cal-Neva Lodge straddling the Nevada-California state line at Crystal Bay on the shore of Lake Tahoe. I was fascinated by the place and wrote a post about the old haunt of Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack that was then was struggling financially. It was for sale, and demolition was its predicted fate.

Now, according to an Associated Press news report, rescue and rehabilitation are about to begin. The 219-room, 10-story hotel closes today to make way for an upgrade, according to Robert Radovan, co-owner of Criswell-Radovan, a St. Helena, California.-based development company that acquired the Cal-Neva in April. The hope is to reopen the revitalized resort on December 12, 2015, the 99th anniversary of Sinatra’s birth.

“Our goal is to bring it back to its former glory and to make it what it was like in Sinatra’s day,” Radovan told the AP. “It has such great soul and character, and it’s needed this redo for many decades.”

The casino has been closed for several years, and while I don’t care a bit about gambling, I acknowledge that casino revenues keep resorts in Nevada and other gambling destinations afloat. But I do have an affinity for history, tradition, legends and uniqueness, so I’m looking forward to seeing the born-again Cal-Neva, modernized and brought up to date but still with that mid-20th-century flair.

New UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany

Fantastic 17th-century site gains additional international recognition

Wilhelmshof near Kassel, Germany, joins the prestigious list of USESCO World Heritage sites.
Wilhelmshof near Kassel, Germany, joins the prestigious list of USESCO World Heritage sites.

Germany’s Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe has been added to the prestigious UNESCO list of global cultural sites considered internationally significant. I’ve never been to the hillside park near Kassel, but I hope to see it one day. It is known for its arresting, intricate water features and the Hercules statue atop the hill as an expression of the ideals and power in the era of European Absolutism, along with the park’s successful blend of landscape design from both the Baroque and Romantic periods.

Landgrave Karl of Hesse-Kassel started the construction of the park in 1689. Unlike the flat Baroque gardens of the day, he decided to have it coming down a hill, overlooking the city of Kassel. This is another feather in Kassel’s cultural cap. The city is best known today for  dOCUMENTA, its international exhibition of contemporary art that takes place every five years. But its traditional renown was as a place of work at the Prince Elector’s court for the Brothers Grimm, where they collected many fairytales.

Water displays were all the rage at Europe’s 17th-century courts, the more spectacular and intricate the better. Landgrave Karl bested them all, starting his with a spectacular waterfall cascading over the edge of the 1,640-foot-high park ridge with no apparent source, captured in a succession of intricately designed basins that descend toward the castle at the bottom, to be caught in front of it in a lake featuring a geyser spewing to heights never seen before.

The Landgrave also adorned the edge of the hill with an 26.9-foot tall Hercules statue mounted on a 97.1-foot pyramid-style obelisk, in turn standing on a 107.1-foot octagonal base pavilion. This monumental ensemble itself measures more than 236 feet. Adding the waterfall cascade below with its basins brings the total height of the Baroque spectacle to just under 590 feet. Some three hundred years later, the water displays still work as they did in the old days — manually operated to create choreographed optical effects to light and music on a schedule, or per occasion, on certain days of the week, depending on the season. Later rulers added to the hillside park, resulting in Romantic-period gardens and English-style landscape architecture descending a steep hill with more follies and more waterways now total 7.45 miles today.

Other attractions in Germany’s 38th UNESCO WHS Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe include the Prince Elector’s residential castle, with its mixture of grand building styles a stately site unto itself. It served as home to Napoleon’s youngest brother, Jérôme I, from 1807 to 1813, when Kassel was capital of Bonaparte’s Kingdom of Westphalia. Exploring the Löwenburg (Lion’s Castle) was built in the same period as the Elector’s residence, it is a replica of a medieval castle ruin. Click here for more information on Kassel and Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe, and here for information on other German UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Gettysburg Battle Reenactment

History recreated for 150th anniversary of epic Civil War battle this weekend

Gettysburg-logoThe 150th Gettysburg Battlefield Reenactment centered on July 1 to 3 historic events has attracted Civil War buffs, military history buffs, general history buffs and any American who wants to honor those who fought and died on that piece of Pennsylvania countryside. “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here,” President Abraham Lincoln declared during the ceremony consecrating the Union cemetery where some of the 10,000 killed in action were buried. How wrong he was. His 10-sentence address has withstood the test of time and set a high bar for succinct speeches that pare important happenings to the historic bone.

An opening volley of musket fire ushered in the start of the milestone commemoration of the Battle of Gettysburg earlier today. Wearing period uniforms, thousands of Civil War buffs gathered on a private farm outside the actual battlefield to take part in the battle re-enactment considered the pinnacle of the avocation. The sights and sounds of faux warfare the draw for some 200,000 people who are expected to descend on the small, south-central Pennsylvania town during the 10-day period that started today.

Gettysbyrg-composite

The National Park Service’s official ceremonies begin Sunday. The events were jointly planned by the Park Service and a host of community organizers and volunteers. It’s a lot of work to welcome hundreds of thousands of visitors to a town of 7,500 people. In 1913, 50,000 Union and Confederate veterans came to Gettysburg for the 50th anniversary of The Battle of Gettysburg, a turning point in the Civil War. The Union victory ended Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s second and most ambitious invasion of the North. Often referred to as the “High Water Mark of the Rebellion,” Gettysburg was the war’s bloodiest battle with 51,000 casualties.

I cannot help but wonder whether, 50 or 100 or 150 years from now, anyone will remember, let alone reenact, America’s 21st century military actions in Iraq or Afghanistan. And if they do, what will they conclude.

McKinley Climb Centennial

100th anniversary of conquest of North America’s highest peak

McKinleySummit-logoOne hundred years ago today, Walter Harper, Harry Karstens,  Hudson Stuck and Robert Tatum reached the 20,320-foot summit of Mt. McKinley from this commanding mountain’s north side. Today, the continent’s highest peak is known by its Koyukon Athabaskan name of Denali (“The High One”), or as Mt. McKinley in Denali National Park.

Karstens and Tatum on Mt. McKinley 100 years ago. Project Gutenberg image.
Karstens and Tatum on Mt. McKinley 100 years ago. Project Gutenberg image.

The main feature of this centennial year is a guided climb by descendants of Harper, Karstens and Stuck. The party is making the Denali 2013 Centennial Climb” following the historic pioneer route up the mountain from its north side. In partnership with Alaska Geographic, the park has produced a new exhibit about the climb, First Ascent of Denali 1913-2013,” for display at the Eielson Visitor Center, near the base of Mount McKinley at Mile 66 of the Denali Park Road, that opened on June 1 and will remain until September 16. Some aspects of the exhibit may also be duplicated for display at the Talkeetna Ranger Station.