Tag Archives: large Ferris wheel

Ride High Over Las Vegas in a “Super Wheel”

World’s biggest Ferris Wheel derivative is Sin City’s newest attraction.

LasVegas-signIn Las Vegas, the house always wins. It is the site of the world’s largest “observation wheel,” several generations removed from the old-time Ferris wheel. With the inauguration of the High Roller launched yesterday with champagne-bottle-breaking fanfare, Las Vegas has won bragging rights for the world’s largest observation wheel for now.

The SkyView HighRoller, or HighRoller Sky Vue, or some other ame welcomed its first passengers yesterday.
A rendering of the SkyViue High Roller or High Roller SkyVue, which welcomed its first passengers yesterday.

It is 550 feet high with 28 40-passenger stand-up glass cabins suspended on the outside of the wheel so as not to obstruct the view. The cabins are designed to revolve around SkyVue, an enormous LED screen promoted as “one of the most effective advertising platforms in the world….With over 100,000 square feet of high definition LED screen, SkyVue integrates the bright lights of Times Square with the eye popping views with the London Eye.”

If eyeballs from pedestrians and people in vehicles the ground aren’t enough, SkyVue screen on the High Roller is visible to more than 39 million airline passengers a year as they take off and land at nearby McCarran Airport, along with guests at high-rise hotels whose rooms look toward it. Caesar’s Entertainment, the High Roller’s developer, sold the naming rights to SkyVue for $1.2 million.

VitalVegas.com, an award-winning local blog, has tempered its enthusiasm for this spectacular attraction, noting:

“SkyVue, plagued by rumors of financial problems and construction delays, was considered by some to be an unlikely candidate to get naming rights to what industry insiders consider “a competing attraction.” Caesars Entertainment, however, felt otherwise. Caesars Entertainment has not been without financial turmoil of its own. The company has approximately $24.5 billion (yes, billion) in debt, or about what it would cost to purchase Paraguay.”

Still, the waiting line for the inaugural day of the super-sized observation wheel was measured at five hours — but maybe that was just to be the first to ride it. The cost is $30 for a 30-minute ride. Each cabin can accommodate a roll-in bar for an intimate private party — even a modest wedding. Reports are that the first marriage proposal occurred on opening day.

This Vegas attraction is the latest entry in what I think of as the “wonder wheel wars.” In the US, contenders are the High Roller (550 feet) and 190 meter (623 feet) the New York Wheel (623 feet), which was scheduled to start construction “early in 2014” on, of all places, Staten Island. Elsewhere, the Singapore Flyer (541 feet), the Star of Nanchang in southeastern China (525 feet) and the London Eye (443 feet) reign over their respective landscapes. Construction was supposed to begin last April on Bluewaters Island, a new island that I believe was recently completed in Dubai, will be the site of The Dubai Eye (650 feet), which will surpass its existing and planned rivals — until China or someone else comes up with an even bigger one.

It is not Las Vegas’s first High Roller — and I’m not counting humans. In 1996, a steel roller coaster called the High Roller opened on top of  the 909-foot Stratosphere Tower, the tallest free-standing observation tower in the country. It wasn’t all that popular, was difficult to maintain and was dismantled in 2005.