Tag Archives: Seven Falls

The Broadmoor is Buying the Seven Falls

Honored resort is adding the Seven Falls to its Colorado Springs portfolio.

Broadmoor-logoThe Broadmoor, Colorado Springs’ greatly honored resort hotel, has a rare timeless quality. On the surface, it never seems to change, but beneath the sense of immutable image, it is constantly adding, upgrading and developing into an ever more wide-ranging property. In the past few years, the resort has developed or is in the process of developing two significant outliers: The Ranch at Emerald Valley (“a unique retreat offering refined luxury with the rustic charm”) reopening this summer after September flood damage. Also, Cloud Camp debuts later this summer at 9,200 feet atop Cheyenne Mountain on the historic site of Broadmoor founder Spencer Penrose’s Cheyenne Lodge, an adobe-style structure with 360-views that was demolished in the 1970s. Click here for a video with details about these developments.

Also in the works, a complete remodel of Broadmoor West, which has splendid views of historic turret-topped Broadmoor Main but in itself was not quite so lovely. In addition to all new guest rooms, Broadmoor West will get its own tower as well as upper-level penthouses. Diners will enjoy three made-over restaurant spaces (La Taverne, Le Jardin and intimate Entre Deux).

The Seven Falls, while a dramatic attraction, are in truth not very photogenic. This old postcard, with each of the individual cascades labeled, is a better depiction.
The Seven Falls, while a dramatic attraction, are in truth not very photogenic. This old postcard, with each of the individual cascades labeled, is a better depiction.

The latest news, as reported by the Colorado Springs Gazette, is that the resort has agreed to purchase the Seven Falls, long a popular local tourist attraction on 1,300 acres in South Cheyenne Canyon and adjacent the Broadmoor’s own vast spread. No closing date or sale price was revealed, but the resort is already looking at a major reclamation project. The attraction, consisting of a daisy chain of seven cascades, was devastated by the floods of 2013 and has been closed ever since.

First developed as a tourist attraction in the 1880s, the falls drop in stages 181 feet into a natural box canyon. Access to the top of the falls has been via a walkway with 224 steps or an elevator within the rock wall. The night-time illumination is a major draw for visitors. The Gazette reported that The Broadmoor will spend $1 million in repairing the flood damage starting with debris cleanup and including replacement of lighting systems, repair of the elevator, strengthening of walls, and rebuilding of parts of the access road and parking lot. If history is a guide, it will all be very well done.